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Evora GX — Locking Brakes
#1
I'm struggling to extract any pace from the Evora because I can't dial in my brakes. I'm using a G29 with the rubber cone. 

At Chang, for example, at turn 2 — the slow right with a very heavy braking zone — I can only depress my pedal about 50-60% of the way before I get brake lockup. Hitting the brakes like I do in an ABS car results in near-immediate lockup, even though that's what's needed to reach maximum braking force on the brake trace. Sometimes the brakes lock at 20-30% force.

I would feel less frustrated if this were merely an issue of better braking control, but I watched the leader's brake trace on replay. He can carry maximum braking force all the way down to the apex at turn 2 with zero tire squeal. 

I've read various posts on different forums about this very problem, and have tried different range settings, brake gamma settings, and depressing the pedal fully before leaving the pits. Nothing has made a difference — I'm nowhere close to being able to use the brakes' maximum force without locking them up.

Any help/insight on this matter is hugely appreciated. I freely acknowledge that I can most definitely improve my brake control, but watching that replay has me thinking that the majority of this problem is down to calibration and settings. 

Thanks.
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#2
You can try moving the brake bias towards the back of the car a couple of clicks. Also, if your wheel is turned (even if only slightly) it will reduce the amount of braking you have available. Try to set the car up so that it will get to the apex without having to steer, then start trail braking when you need to turn the front wheels.

I'm having a hard time trying to picture what you're saying so maybe include a vid clip and then we can compare it.

I don't have a g29 so I can't help with settings and stuff, but I doubt that thats the problem.
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#3
I tend to lower Brake Power down to as low as 80% or so, depending on the car/track combo. The latest Evora setup I have saved has Brake Power at 90%. This setting essentially just increases your effective range of your hardware since it is possible to find the hardest braking you will ever do on fresh tyres on a track in a straight line, and then just lower Brake Power until you lock them up with it pressed as hard as you can press it. I'm by no means the best braker, but I'm pretty good at preventing lockups in general in just about any car... Brake Bias and Power are the two settings I typically goto to help.
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#4
I very much sympathise with what Dylan is saying. More than on other cars (and especially more than on open wheels), the frustrating experience with the Evora is that the same (perceived) action delivers very different results. Read: you feel you are applying the same braking pressure and you get different behaviours - blocking, late braking, early braking; good braking seems to happen by chance rather than intention. A real mess, in my experience. Lowering the brake power as suggested by Russell helped me a lot.
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#5
(05-02-2019, 08:34 AM)Pete Parisetti Wrote:  I very much sympathise with what Dylan is saying. More than on other cars (and especially more than on open wheels), the frustrating experience with the Evora is that the same (perceived) action delivers very different results. Read: you feel you are applying the same braking pressure and you get different behaviours - blocking, late braking, early braking; good braking seems to happen by chance rather than intention. A real mess, in my experience. Lowering the brake power as suggested by Russell helped me a lot.

Its also a matter of setting the controls in the options, my braking pedal is full power at 65% and my foot KNOWS this. Now see if you can do it with either foot.
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#6
Don't forget that your braking technique should be different for cars with and without ABS.
Without ABS you should push the pedal progressively and feel where the limit of grip is. Lowering the brake power might be a good idea most of the times but if you do it too much you will be slower, as you will have to brake before the other drivers, and you won't be able to learn this technique.
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#7
Exactly. That's why I say you should only lower it so that it is still JUST possible to lock up all your wheels* on a full depress. If you can still lock up everything on a straight line brake, you aren't missing any NEEDED range of your brake pedal.

*Or get ABS to trigger, where applicable.
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#8
Many options

- Move bias back, reasonably, one or two clicks at a time.
- More negative camber / positive toe
- More aero, that counts for braking, but can't remember exactly how much you can change it on the Evora. It can also compensate some of the added bias. Put enough of it so you don't start rotating too much with mid pressure brake, typically you want some lightness on the back at the end of the braking zone to help turning, but not halfway in the zone.
- Brake more in line, straighter wheels. Hard at first to break the most speed while you still have the weight transfer going on, but easy it up quicker (more so than usual with ABS)
- Play with tyres pressure, see what works best in the front for a particular track. Don't overheat the front, usually that's better to have higher pressure than higher temp, to limit locking. If you get in a death circle of heat/locking, don't panic just hit your marks a bit earlier until it settles back right.

I don't like lowering brake pressure without ABS, you can still apply full pressure in plenty more situations than just straight lignes, just have to modulate it more. This is going to significantly increase your braking distance, to miss all the parts of the braking you could have smashed it but if more comfortable with it and you feel you can push harder or be more consistent, then fine (driver confidence in the car/setup is always key to laptimes)
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#9
Thanks to all for the answers and tips. I'll adjust my settings in practice and see what I can work out.

On a side note, I feel much better on the brakes at Mugello, even on the stock setup. Still miles off the pace of the fast drivers, but not languishing at the back. It's almost as if practice helps one to improve. /s
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