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Ginetta GT4
#1
Hi,

After doing 1,5(didnt finish the second race because the car annoyed me that much) race in the updated ginetta i found that i really dislike the way it drives.
It handles like a brick that doesnt want to turn in, all I get is understeer. Now you could argue that I take too much speed into the corner, which I doubt is happening seeing as everyone is able to brake later than I am.Watching other people drive just shows them doing stuff Im not able to do with the car.
I found driving through the Michael Schumacher S full throttle with my steering wheel turned 1080 degrees a bit weird, but it seemed that is the fastest way. If I lift i wont have to turn my wheel 1080 degrees but it means i lose time. I doubt when they drive these cars in real life they have to turn their steering wheel 1080 degrees to take any corner...
Why did we have to switch over to this version? I just drove a lap in the other one and that car turns in just fine. For people like me who dont know how to set up a car it means ill be driving a understeering shitbox that cant even get its tyres up to temperature for a whole season.. I loved this other version of this car, made for some great racing but this car is just undrivable(for me at least)
Is there maybe someone whos willing to help a brother out with a setup that makes the car want to turn in?
''All the time you havea to leavea the space''

As said by Fernando Alonso in broken english during the Bahrein GP 2012
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#2
Man, I found it actually oversteery... First thing I've done is to add one more rear wing point, making it full. It was turning too much at Michael's S for me. If I touch the kerb, I do spin.
I kept working on making the car less oversteery using roll bars, tightenting the front and softening the back. I guess that's why they say setups are a very personal thing.
If you want the car to turn more, just reverse what I did: less wing, softer front ARB and tighter rear.

Regards!
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#3
(11-22-2017, 04:47 PM)Javier Malonda Wrote:  Man, I found it actually oversteery... First thing I've done is to add one more rear wing point, making it full. It was turning too much at Michael's S for me. If I touch the kerb, I do spin.
I kept working on making the car less oversteery using roll bars, tightenting the front and softening the back. I guess that's why they say setups are a very personal thing.
If you want the car to turn more, just reverse what I did: less wing, softer front ARB and tighter rear.

Regards!

Ill try it out, thanks!
''All the time you havea to leavea the space''

As said by Fernando Alonso in broken english during the Bahrein GP 2012
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#4
I like this version much better. The old Ginetta was a brick for me. The new one you can control under or oversteer balancing the car with brake and gas pretty easily.

I have 3 wing and a little more negative camber at the front, and less at the rear. It was just to try something, but I liked how it handled so I didn't touch anything else. It's a bit unstable on braking sometimes tho.

The thing is, I think it's easy to induce understeer on this car by turning the wheel just a bit too much. Yesterday on Schumacher S my car went straight when I turned the wheel. I turned in a bit late, so I turned more the wheel to compensate (too much), and I also think it had something to do with the way the car left the right kerb at the entry, maybe it unsettled the car a bit too much. It was very weird and happened very fast.

I spin on Schumacher S if I touch the inside kerb of the left hander too Javier. So I try not to touch it  Big Grin The car can do those corners well without going over that kerb, just going over the right hander and over the exit kerb if needed.
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#5
(11-24-2017, 08:11 PM)Pedro Gomez Wrote:  I like this version much better. The old Ginetta was a brick for me. The new one you can control under or oversteer balancing the car with brake and gas pretty easily.

I have 3 wing and a little more negative camber at the front, and less at the rear. It was just to try something, but I liked how it handled so I didn't touch anything else. It's a bit unstable on braking sometimes tho.

The thing is, I think it's easy to induce understeer on this car by turning the wheel just a bit too much. Yesterday on Schumacher S my car went straight when I turned the wheel. I turned in a bit late, so I turned more the wheel to compensate (too much), and I also think it had something to do with the way the car left the right kerb at the entry, maybe it unsettled the car a bit too much. It was very weird and happened very fast.

I spin on Schumacher S if I touch the inside kerb of the left hander too Javier. So I try not to touch it  Big Grin The car can do those corners well without going over that kerb, just going over the right hander and over the exit kerb if needed.

You can make it more stable under braking by raising the bumpers (particularly front bumpers) a bit. I also stiffened up the suspension a bit, in fact nearly as much as I could compensate for with the ride height settings.*
Overall, appart from the unstability under heavy breaking, I like the new version of the car very much, too, and of that you can take care. It has great adjustability and I think exactly the right amount of power for a hourly series. Heart

* Disclaimer: I'm rather slow so you should take my setup advice with a pinch of salt. Wink
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#6
I'll try it Michael, thank you. I don't usually change anything in the suspension if I do my own setup. I understand more or less some parts of the suspension, but I prefer not to mess with those scary numbers Big Grin
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#7
Yes. I'm having a hard time with terminal understeer with the car. I've reduced the wing to 2, increased negative camber and dialed some toe, but can't get the car to turn-in under throttle. I would rather do some sort of differential adjustment on on-throttle lock up, but it doesn't have the option to do that.

I haven't done anything with basic and advanced bump settings - it's beyond me. I have dialed in spring and bar setups, which has helped with initial turn in, but I can't do anything while on throttle - it still pushes and is slow compared to everyone else.

Maybe i'm driving it wrong, but I can't seem to maintain speed through a turn without pushing on exit.
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#8
Well with 100% throttle it doesn't turn very much. In fact when I feel the car oversteering I just slam the throttle and the back gets planted instantly.

You have to point the car on corner entry with the brake, doing a bit of trail braking. Sometimes the mentioned braking unstablity helps with that, the back of the car moves a bit but you can control it and stop it from rotate with the nose pointed just where you need. And then you can begin to apply throttle, or just slam it if you are sure the nose is pointed to the right place. Once you are on throttle, if you made a mistake and the car is understeering you'll have to lift, turning the wheel more will only make things worst. Sometimes just a bit of lifting (like from 100% to 80%) for a very brief moment is enough and you barely lose time.

This car's balance is very sensible to brake and throttle inputs, so just a little change on those and the car rotates much more or much less.
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#9
(11-26-2017, 11:06 AM)Pedro Gomez Wrote:  Well with 100% throttle it doesn't turn very much. In fact when I feel the car oversteering I just slam the throttle and the back gets planted instantly.

You have to point the car on corner entry with the brake, doing a bit of trail braking. Sometimes the mentioned braking unstablity helps with that, the back of the car moves a bit but you can control it and stop it from rotate with the nose pointed just where you need. And then you can begin to apply throttle, or just slam it if you are sure the nose is pointed to the right place. Once you are on throttle, if you made a mistake and the car is understeering you'll have to lift, turning the wheel more will only make things worst. Sometimes just a bit of lifting (like from 100% to 80%) for a very brief moment is enough and you barely lose time.

This car's balance is very sensible to brake and throttle inputs, so just a little change on those and the car rotates much more or much less.


It almost sounds like you are saying to drive it like a FWD car... That's essentially how I drive the Abarth - trail brake and over rotate it into a corner, then hammer the throttle to straighten it out once you have the nose pointed where you want.
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#10
(11-26-2017, 09:04 PM)Albert Castro Wrote:  
(11-26-2017, 11:06 AM)Pedro Gomez Wrote:  Well with 100% throttle it doesn't turn very much. In fact when I feel the car oversteering I just slam the throttle and the back gets planted instantly.

You have to point the car on corner entry with the brake, doing a bit of trail braking. Sometimes the mentioned braking unstablity helps with that, the back of the car moves a bit but you can control it and stop it from rotate with the nose pointed just where you need. And then you can begin to apply throttle, or just slam it if you are sure the nose is pointed to the right place. Once you are on throttle, if you made a mistake and the car is understeering you'll have to lift, turning the wheel more will only make things worst. Sometimes just a bit of lifting (like from 100% to 80%) for a very brief moment is enough and you barely lose time.

This car's balance is very sensible to brake and throttle inputs, so just a little change on those and the car rotates much more or much less.


It almost sounds like you are saying to drive it like a FWD car... That's essentially how I drive the Abarth - trail brake and over rotate it into a corner, then hammer the throttle to straighten it out once you have the nose pointed where you want.
Well the way it handles makes it feel like a FWD car, if I even look at the throttle while taking a corner the car wants to go straight..
''All the time you havea to leavea the space''

As said by Fernando Alonso in broken english during the Bahrein GP 2012
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